Samsung

Can Samsung beat Apple to an ‘all screen’ phone? Patent reveals radical new Galaxy design without bezels or a notch

While Apple’s iPhone X gave a glimpse into the future of ‘all screen’ phones, Samsung may beat the Cupertino giant to the punch, a new patent has revealed.

While Apple’s handset still relies on a ‘notch’ to house its sensors, the Samsung patent shows off a button-free, bezel-free, headphone jack-free phone that is all screen.

The concept also appears to have a second screen on the rear of the phone.

 Scroll down for video

While Apple's handset still relies on a 'notch' to house its sensors, the Samsung patent shows off a button-free, bezel-free, headphone jack-free phone that is all screen. The concept also appears to have a second screen on the rear of the phone.

While Apple’s handset still relies on a ‘notch’ to house its sensors, the Samsung patent shows off a button-free, bezel-free, headphone jack-free phone that is all screen. The concept also appears to have a second screen on the rear of the phone.

The patent was applied for last year in September, and was published this week after Samsung asked it to remain private.

‘This is the design that Galaxy smartphones have been waiting for,’ said Dutch site Mobielkopen.

The patent appears to show Samsung is following Apple and paring back its physical hardware in favour of hidden features and wireless connectivity.

It also shows no fingerprint sensor, although one could be embedded under the screen, and no headphone jack.

Samsung is also developing a revolutionary folding handset, expected to be called the Galaxy X, is expected to go on sale later this year – and could cost $1800.

Patents for the device show a book-like handset that can be opened to transform into a tablet

 

Patents for the device show a book-like handset that can be opened to transform into a tablet

The eagerly anticipated phone, which is codenamed ‘winner’, is expected to go on sale later this year.

Kim Jang-yeol, head of research at Golden Bridge Investment, told the Korea Times the suggested retail price tag of the Samsung foldable phone, could about 2 million won ($1800 or £1350) without subsidies from carriers.

In a recent earnings conference, Samsung confirmed that it was in the process of developing a smartphone that could be folded.

The foldable smartphone will have a 7.3-inch OLED screen, and when the device is folded, the display size is estimated to be 4.5-inches.

Samsung Electronics showed the prototype to major U.S. and European mobile carriers in separate private meetings during CES in Las Vegas earlier this year.

Late last year patent drawings revealed more details of Samsung’s first foldable phone.

WHAT’S INSIDE THE NOTCH: HOW APPLE’S FACE ID WORKS

Face ID uses a TrueDepth front-facing camera on the iPhone X, which has multiple components.

A Dot Projector projects more than 30,000 invisible dots onto your face to map its structure.

The dot map is then read by an infrared camera and the structure of your face is relayed to the A11 Bionic chip in the iPhone X, where it is turned into a mathematical model.

The A11 chip then compares your facial structure to the facial scan stored in the iPhone X during the setup process.

Face ID uses infrared to scan your face, so it works in low lighting conditions and in the dark.

It will only unlock your device when you look in the direction of the iPhone X with your eyes open.

Face ID captures both a 3-D and 2-D image of your face using infrared light while you’re looking straight at the camera.

Apple’s iPhone X ‘notch’ houses the sensors needed for its FaceID system, amongst other sensors

Five unsuccessful attempts at Face ID will force you to enter a passcode – which you’ll need anyway just to set up facial recognition.

That requires you to come up with a secure string of digits – or, for extra security, a string of letters and numbers – to protect your privacy.

Face ID also adapts to changes in your appearance over time, so it will continue to recognize you as you grow a beard or grow your hair longer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *